Sunday, April 30, 2017

A Lost Opportunity At Hammonasset

For a handful of days after mid April 2017 Hammonasset Beach State Park was host to a rare species of bird for its time and place.

The Killdeer above (image 1) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.

A conscientious effort on my part to avoid bad weather led to a late attempt to observe a Lapland Longspur that was reported by a handful of Connecticut birders.


The Tree Swallow with prey above (image 2) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Willet above (image 3) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Little Blue Heron above (image 4) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Northern Mockingbird above (image 5) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Glossy Ibis above (image 6) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Osprey above (image 7) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 8) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Double-crested Cormorant above (image 9) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The European Starling above (image 10) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.


The Red-winged Blackbird above (image 11) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.

In the brief time I devoted to observe the longspur at Hammonasset Beach State Park it was regrettably absent while other familiar species made brief appearances.


The Greater Yellowlegs above (image 12) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.

Please be sure to be reminded about this Wildlife Blog with the email gadget located at the top of the page.


The American Robin above (image 13) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in April 2017.

Friday, March 31, 2017

A Productive Frozen Boat Launch

Rare eBird lists for Connecticut remain a little shorter than those for Florida in my experience.


The 1st Winter Great Black-backed Gull with adult above (image 1) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

Nonetheless I was intrigued by reports of rare species of goose being reported at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Hartford County Connecticut in mid-winter. A species commonly seen here in New England in the winter months was remarkably seen at Bunche Beach Preserve during December and January in Fort Myers reported as possibly two sub-species of Brant.


The American Crow above (image 2) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The immature Herring Gull above (image 3) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Bald Eagle above (image 4) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

My arrival at the boat launch was around sunrise on a very chilly and windy morning. My target species was Barnacle Goose reported for days earlier than my arrival. The pair of Barnacle Geese apparently making their way around Enfield were hit or miss in the following weeks.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 5) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Common Goldeneye above (image 6) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The hybrid Greylag x Canada Goose with Canada Goose above (image 7) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

The Connecticut River was partially frozen along its edges which made for an occasional alarm as the ice cracked. I only a few times thought about walking out on it while keeping my senses not to.


The Herring Gull above (image 8) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Canada Goose above (image 9) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 10) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

A huge number of Canada Goose hid the Barnacle Goose which were remarkably close and unseen from my observation point. With the help of a few expert birders with scopes, a hybrid Graylag x Canada Goose and Pink Footed Goose were eventually photographed as well.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 11) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Mallard above (image 12) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.


The Mallard above (image 13) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

It was very rewarding to make the observations. By late morning I was ready to call it a day.


The Barnacle Goose with Canada Goose above (image 14) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

Please be sure to be reminded about this Wildlife Blog with the email gadget located at the top of the page.


The Pink-footed Goose with Canada Goose above (image 15) was photographed at Donald W. Barnes Boat Launch in Enfield, Connecticut in February 2017.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Return To Hammonasset Beach State Park

A second visit to Hammonasset Beach State Park was made a couple of days after my first on New Year's Day when it was warmer with the park surprisingly crowded with visitors.


The Mallard above (image 1) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

I again made a motor birding tour as the ankle heals. I gravitated to the pond northwest of the traffic circle which I consider a hotspot within the eBird hotspot devoting the two hours before sunset for observations.


The American Black Duck above (image 2) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Northern Harrier above (image 3) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Northern Harrier above (image 4) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Northern Harrier above (image 5) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

It was an enjoyable afternoon with comparatively balmy conditions. There was apparently not as great a need for the wildlife to take refuge in the pond this day as many flocks of birds flew past.


The Mallard above (image 6) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Great Blue Heron above (image 7) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Northern Harrier above (image 8) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Northern Harrier above (image 9) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

Hammonasset Beach State Park has shown great potential for interesting wildlife observations even with minimal exploration. The full tour of miles often noted in eBird reports for this venue seems prudent for the ultimate experience.


The Northern Harrier above (image 10) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Mallard above (image 11) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Green-winged Teal above (image 12) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.


The Mallard above (image 13) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

eBirders Tina Green and Frank Mantlick reported Hammonasset Beach State Park's 305th bird species (Barrow's Goldeneye) 15 February 2017.


The immature Sharp-shinned Hawk above (image 14) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

Please be sure to be reminded about this Wildlife Blog with the email gadget located at the top of the page.


The Mallard above (image 15) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in January 2017.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

A Cold Connecticut Birding Day

On a cold day, make that a very cold day with winds causing discomfort for a former Floridian, I made efforts to observe a reported Barrow's Goldeneye near Tuxis Island in Connecticut to close my 2016 wildlife observations.


The Herring Gull above (image 1) was photographed at East Wharf Beach Park in December 2016.

I heard from wildlife blogger Hemant Kishan who told me that he has seen Barrow's Goldeneye on the Detroit River which is another out of bounds observation of the species with this species typically seen in the northwest corner of the United States. The Barrow's Goldeneye is readily identified in comparison to Common Goldeneye by a comma shaped white patch on its face.


The Red-breasted Merganser above (image 2) was photographed near East Wharf Beach Park in December 2016.


The Common Goldeneye above (image 3) was photographed near East Wharf Beach Park in December 2016.

Initial observations to find the Barrow's Goldeneye were made at noontime near Tuxis Island in Madison, Connecticut, on 30 December 2016 with four birders on the scene. As far as I could tell there were no good birds in the swells and heavy winds. From here I made my way to East Wharf Beach Park along Middle Beach Road as recommended by one of the birders.


The Mallard above (image 4) was photographed at Hammonasset Beach State Park in December 2016.


The Barrow's Goldeneye with Bufflehead above (image 5) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.

Without seeing the Barrow's Goldeneye in my 90 minutes of observations I continued further east toward Hammonasset Beach State Park. Driving along Middle Beach Road I caught sight of a pair of Red-breasted Merganser and a Bufflehead. They doubled their distance from the shoreline by the time I backed up the car to take a few photos.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 6) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.


The Common Goldeneye above (image 7) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.

My arrival at Hammonasset Beach State Park 30 January would be my first visit after reading many eBird reports from this Long Island Sound "hotspot" that has hosted 304 bird species as reported at eBird. I made a slow drive along all the primary roadways. Although the wind was wicked this day with my tripod being blown over before I could get the camera and lens secured west of the traffic circle I was excited by the sighting of a Great Black-backed Gull working the perimeter of the pond. There were Mallard in decent numbers, more than I had seen at any one time while making observations in Florida. A male Northern Harrier was seen perched across the pond.


The Herring Gull above (image 8) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.


The Ring-billed Gull above (image 9) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.

As I began to succumb to the cold conditions at Hammonasset I opted to return to Tuxis Island where the specialty bird had been reported. The winds were diminishing closer to sunset and the waves were not as high as earlier in the day. There were a good number of Common Goldeneye with a Bufflehead diving on the shoreside of Gull Rock. Too far for me to identify the Barrow's Goldeneye with my camera alone. I still hadn't unpacked my bins. Further inspection of images captured revealed a life bird for me.


The sunset above (image 10) was photographed near Tuxis Island in December 2016.

Please be sure to be reminded about this Wildlife Blog with the email gadget located at the top of the page.