Friday, August 19, 2016

Whimbrel At Carlos Pointe: Part II

The Whimbrel that had been reported daily at Carlos Pointe for nearly a week prior to my visit was of course not guaranteed to be there.


The Roseate Spoonbill above (image 1) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

The Whimbrel was difficult to identify as it was found to be loafing with its bill hidden in its right wing while surrounded by Marbled Godwits and Willets. The Whimbrel was not very photogenic in the ensuing hours of my observations except on a few occasions when it was preening.


The Willet above (image 2) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Whimbrel above (image 3) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Whimbrel above (image 4) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Whimbrel above (image 5) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 6) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Sanderling above (image 7) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Common Ground-Dove above (image 8) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Sanderling above (image 9) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

An advantage of staying in place for my observations was that several of the sandpipers on hand walked by me at nearly an arm's reach. Scanning the large area of beach toward Little Estero Lagoon did not offer much activity with the vast majority of late nesters on their way to their wintering grounds.


The Willet above (image 10) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Laughing Gull above (image 11) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Willet above (image 12) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Western Sandpiper above (image 13) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 14) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Least Sandpiper above (image 15) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Sandwich Tern above (image 16) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Semipalmated Plover above (image 17) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

It was good to meet up with Ed Combs, Bird Patrol volunteer and wildlife writer for Ding Darling NWR. While I was waiting for the next burst of action in the pool, Ed pointed out the over-summering Black Scoter which was drifting toward the Gulf.


The Black-bellied Plover above (image 18) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Black Skimmer above (image 19) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Black Skimmer above (image 20) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Black Skimmer above (image 21) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Osprey with prey above (image 22) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Black Skimmer above (image 23) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Ruddy Turnstone above (image 24) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Least Sandpiper above (image 25) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

A flock of Western Sandpiper seemingly flew in from nowhere. And a moment later a larger flock of Sanderling and Ruddy Turnstone clearly came from further up the beach. It would very soon become apparent why as four powered paragliders came over the horizon.


The Sandwich Tern above (image 26) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Sandwich Tern above (image 27) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 28) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Whimbrel above (image 29) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Osprey with prey above (image 30) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Western Sandpiper with Ruddy Turnstone and Semipalmated Plover above (image 31) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Royal Tern above (image 32) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Royal Tern above (image 33) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

Three of the paragliders flew their craft over the water, but one opted to fly over the birds on the beach. The result was that the birds considered the paraglider a threat, and all took flight in unison.


The Royal Tern above (image 34) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Willet above (image 35) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The powered paraglider above (image 36) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The powered paraglider above (image 37) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Willet above (image 38) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The powered paraglider above (image 39) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 40) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Red Knot above (image 41) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

About a fifth of the birds that were present in the moment of their blast off returned to the pool after the paraglider passed. The Whimbrel was unfortunately not among them. The Whimbrel had been reported to eBird thereafter and was most recently reported on 17 AUG at the time of this writing.


The Snowy Egret above (image 42) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The juvenile Sandwich Tern above (image 43) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Great Blue Heron above (image 44) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.


The Great Blue Heron with Willet, Marbled Godwit and Ruddy Turnstone above (image 44) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

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The Double-crested Cormorant above (image 45) was photographed at Carlos Pointe in August 2016.

Please also see Whimbrel At Carlos Pointe: Part I

6 comments:

  1. Loved the action pictures of # 2 - Willet and # 9 - Sanderling! Bob have you ever been paragliding?
    Adele

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    1. Thank you, Adele. I have not taken to the air other than in helicopters and jet aircraft. I was hoping that someone might ask about powered paragliding as it appears to allow one to nearly fly like a bird. I have been considering the use of a drone aircraft for wildlife documentation (and welcome all criticism). It would be unfortunate that something is dismissed.

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  2. Congrats on getting the Whimbrel, Bob! In the UK you could even count the Hudsonian Whimbrel as a separate Species! I would also hope for finding a Semipalmated Sandpiper among the Westerns..... Nice to see the Knots still with a bit of a red blush....

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    1. Thank you, Hemant. It was good to catch the Whimbrel. I didn't look for the SESA on this visit. There may have been a subject this day. Perhaps seen if I rolled on the ground with no distractions.

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  3. Beautiful series of images! And congrets on getting the Whimbrel, awesome!
    greetings,
    Maria

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    1. Thank you, Maria. I've been very fortunate to photograph the Whimbrel on a few occasions.

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