Friday, October 4, 2013

Lucky Hammock, A.D. Barnes Park, And More

The Southeastern portion of the Great Florida Birding Trail "South Florida Section" is not visited as often as I would like, but had the good fortune to travel with Tom Obrock on a day trip on 19 September 2013 to several wildlife venues in the Miami area.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.

A near sunrise arrival at Luck Hammock close to the entrance to Everglades National Park was our first stop. The observation of Alder Flycatcher and Willow Flycatcher were hoped for, but missed. Both of these species would have been initial observations for me.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.

While Tom worked the area that the flycatchers were expected to be seen, after walking that area myself, I devoted the time at the venue observing the 15 or so Eastern Kingbirds that were very active close to where our access to the Annex was prohibited except by walking.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.

I suspect the Red-shouldered Hawk perched on a tree above where the flycatchers had been observed earlier may have caused the flycatchers to move on. It was interesting to read in Dick Brewer's Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary blog that a Red-shouldered Hawk was observed to attempt to catch a Green Heron on 27 September at the Swamp.


The Blue Jay above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The Eastern Kingbird above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The dragonfly above was photographed at Lucky Hammock in September 2013.


The scene above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.

After the visit to Lucky Hammock we traveled for a quick stop at the visitor's center at Everglades National Park. I have read that hummingbirds have seen here, but failed to see them as on all stops made thus far. There was a large flock of European Starling among grackles that dropped in briefly with possible Palm Warblers, and did not take any pics here worth including in this article.


The scene above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.


The Black-throated Blue Warbler above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.


The Semipalmated Plover above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.


The Ruddy Turnstone above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.

Tom and I next traveled to Matheson Hammock Park and Beach. This was my first visit to this venue. It appeared quiet to me though Tom found some good activity. I was pleased to find a lone Black-throated Blue Warbler, only the second time observing this species as I recall. Before leaving the park, we had considered walking the heavily wooded trail to the west of the open area.


The Miami skyline above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.


The Miami skyline above was photographed at Matheson Hammock Park and Marina in September 2013.


The Golden silk orb-weaver above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Eastern-wood Pewee above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.

At the trail's entrance it was apparent that it had yet to be traveled that morning, and would be difficult for me to walk through it with the camera gear without encountering spider webs and their spiders which I get my fill of at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.


The American Redstart above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Blue Jay above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Hill Myna above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Hill Myna above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.

Tom agreed to pass on that. We attempted to visit the far side of the trail by driving to it, though found it unrewarding as Tom walked in at a point where there was no parking available and discovering no bird activity.


The Hill Myna above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The immature Great Crested Flycatcher above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The immature Great Crested Flycatcher above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The immature Great Crested Flycatcher above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.

While it wasn't until after noon before we reached A. D. Barnes Park, personally visited for the first time, I found it the most enjoyable. A Red Fox was observed here although I was too stunned by its appearance to take a photograph. Fortunately Tom observed the fox a short while later to corroborate its presence.


The Ovenbird above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Ovenbird above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Ovenbird above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


One of 285 species of squirrel above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.

There was comparatively a lot of warbler activity at A. D. Barnes which allowed for good observations before we took a brief break for lunch. During our visit, Tom discovered that a Lavender Waxbill had been observed at Barnes earlier in the morning after checking Florida rare bird alerts. That specialty was missed by less than five hours. After a quick bite we returned to Barnes before heading to Kendall Baptist Hospital for a brief visit with observation of a huge flock of Mitred Parakeets.


The Northern Parula above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Northern Parula above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The 1st year Blue-gray Gnatcatcher above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.


The Muscovy Duck (Florida feral type) above was photographed at West Kendall Baptist Hospital in September 2013.

We then returned to Barnes for more observations though the venue proved continuously less productive although a few overflights offered great interest. Late in the afternoon on the long ride back to the Fort Myers area, I thought it fortunate that we dodged rain the entire day, while treated to a large number of Red-shouldered Hawks on the last leg of the trip.


The Egyptian Goose above was photographed at West Kendall Baptist Hospital in September 2013.


The Florida softshell turtle above was photographed at West Kendall Baptist Hospital in September 2013.

On future trips to the Miami area, I will consider A.D. Barnes Park the prized first stop.


The stray cat above was photographed at A. D. Barnes Park in September 2013.

5 comments:

  1. Beautiful shots of the birds in flight. Never heard of the oven bird, but it sure is a beauty!

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  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. Lovely bird and very nice pictures

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  3. I've never seen a Hill Myna before, so thanks for sharing. Your photos and dialogue is great.

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