Friday, May 27, 2016

Little Estero Lagoon Spring Nesting: Part II

For good reason Little Estero Lagoon comes in a close second as a favorite Southwest Florida wildlife venue behind Bunche Beach Preserve.


The Black Scoter above (image 1) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.

The birds were very accommodating as I continued my walk south toward Carlos Pointe and back. The Black Scoter was an especially nice find with their behavior "ridiculously tame" as world wildlife photographer Artie Morris would say.


The Black Scoter above (image 2) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Black Scoter above (image 3) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.

As was normal the wildlife came to me. A particularly interesting observation was an Osprey that dropped from the sky to the pool at Carlos Point. I thought the bird would take a bath, but it appeared more concerned with another Osprey overhead and took flight inexplicably.


The Least Tern above (image 4) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Magnificent Frigatebird above (image 5) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Ruddy Turnstone above (image 6) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Least Tern above (image 7) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Least Tern above (image 8) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Least Tern above (image 9) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Ruddy Turnstone with Willet above (image 10) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Ruddy Turnstone above (image 11) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Ruddy Turnstone above (image 12) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Brown Pelican above (image 13) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 14) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 15) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 16) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 17) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 18) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Osprey above (image 19) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Black-bellied Plover above (image 20) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 21) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 22) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 23) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Marbled Godwit above (image 24) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Least Tern above (image 25) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Western Sandpiper above (image 26) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Least Sandpiper above (image 27) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Black Skimmer above (image 28) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Laughing Gull above (image 29) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Royal Tern above (image 30) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Black Scoter above (image 31) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Great Egret above (image 32) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Reddish Egret above (image 33) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Reddish Egret above (image 34) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Reddish Egret with prey above (image 35) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Reddish Egret with prey above (image 36) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Marl Pennant Dragonfly above (image 37) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The White Ibis above (image 38) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The scene above (image 39) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The American Oystercatcher above (image 40) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The American Oystercatcher above (image 41) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The American Oystercatcher above (image 42) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The American Oystercatcher with Willet above (image 43) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.

Expected nesting bird species were present and in various stages of behavior. When observing the American Oystercatcher I was particularly intrigued by the protection of the nest. All species of bird loafing near it were flushed with the exception of Wilson's Plover.


The Anhinga above (image 44) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.


The Double-crested Cormorant above (image 45) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.

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The European Starling with prey above (image 46) was photographed at Little Estero Lagoon in May 2016.

Please also see Little Estero Lagoon Spring Nesting: Part I

8 comments:

  1. Beautiful picture of the Osprey #16 !
    Adele

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  2. Wonderful documentation Bob of this little gem -- it is so crucially important to the species that breed there. Glad to see the Oystercatchers, Plovers and Least Terns thriving there!

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    1. Thank you, Hemant. I wonder if the nesting Black Skimmer will outnumber the Least Tern. A reminder of the value of many of the beaches and barrier islands along the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Evermore critical wildlife habitat for the nesting species.

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    2. This year on Sanibel many Least Terns were nesting and the area was roped off, unfortunately the Coyote once again wiped the next generation - I was very saddened when I heard, it's a tough world out there.

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    3. If it's not the Coyote wreaking havoc there, it's unfortunately another predator raiding nests somewhere else nearby. There is certainly a balance between the species that is adjusted over time.

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